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R.I.P. Jud Larson


Jud left with Buzz Barton right


Jud


Jud


Jud


Jud


Jud's story


Jud


Jud on left


Jud interviewed


Jud relaxing


Jud


Jud


Jud


Jud on a walk


Jud in his car


Jud getting a trophy


Jud


Jud in his car


Jud


Jud with Parnilli Jones


Jud


Jud


Jud and the trophy girl


Jud putting his number on the car


Jud just waiting to fire it off


Nice art work

Jud's cars


# 3


Jud ran against Bobby Unser here on the night he died


# 16


Great drawing


# 4


# 9


# 8


Indy car


Indy car


# 3



# 2 Jud wins Duquoin 1957


# 4 in A J Watson's Offy


# 5 at Belleville 1955


Indy car and crew


# 25 the Chet Wilson Offy killer 1963


# 17


Jud vs Don Branson


Jud in a stock car


Jud


# 35


# 5


# 5


# 66 at Indy 1952


# 2


# 4


# 9


# 5


Indy car


sideways


# 2


# 2


# 92


# 2 drawing


# 21 at Winchester


T-shirt graphics


# 4


# 87 1964 at Springfield


Jud chasing down Johnny White on May 31, 1964


Jud in # 4 in 1959 (when I was a senior in high school?)


# 35 at Longhorne Speedway


# 2 running outside Greg Weld


# 5


# 2 in 1957


Jud sideways


# 10 golden state 100 in 1965


# 9 1958


# 97 at the Hoosier 100 in 1964


# 1


# 25


# 7


Jud in the car


# 5


# 25


Jud at Reading 1958


# 17


# 35


# 2


# 2


# 97


# 1


# 7


@ 1

Eugene Wesley (Jud) Larson (January 21, 1923 Grand Prairie, Texas – June 11, 1966 Reading, Pennsylvania) was an American racecar driver.

Larson drove in the USAC Championship Car series, racing in the 1956-1959 and 1964-1965 seasons with 53 starts, including the 1958 and 1959 Indianapolis 500 races. He finished in the top ten 38 times, with 7 victories.

Larson died as a result of injuries sustained in a sprint car crash that also claimed the life of Red Riegel.

He was inducted in the National Sprint Car Hall of Fame in 1992.

Texas born Jud Larson had a 27-year career of auto racing, competing in hundreds of races. His early years were spent racing in Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas and Iowa on the half mile dirt tracks that spawned many fierce competitions after the WWII years, and was 1948 AAA southwest midget champion. He passed his Indianapolis 500 rookie test in 1952, but abruptly returned to the dirt tracks. Jud wasn’t past running unsanctioned AAA events, I believe its called “Running Outlaw” or race every chance you get.

Jud’s midget car racing days gave way to the sprint cars in 1955 or 1956, and the racing community would learn and realize who Jud Larson was.

In 1964 he broke into the USAC sprint car racing, proving he was a real contender. In his first year, he won six out of 19 sprint races and finished a strong second in the point standings.

In 1965 he won four of the first six sprint car events and led the point standings for more than half the season, then mechanical ailments overshadowed the remainder of the 1965 season and in the final standings Jud finished ninth.

Jud Larson was one of auto racings all time hard chargers, that has that amazing gladiator imagery of the strong-armed Larson setting the car sideways, running flat out, in a rim-riding breathtaking bravado. There was no pretense whatsoever about him. Jud Larson was very popular and had personality to match, and was always surrounded by autograph hunters win or lose.

Updated 12/7/17

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